Category: Photography

My 2022 Favorite Photos

Close up of a couple of mating emerald damselflies (Lestes sponsa)
Emerald Damselfly (Lestes sponsa)

As 2022 draws to an end, it’s only natural to review the past year. Let’s have a look then, shall we?

This couple of emerald damselflies is one of my absolute favorite photos because it was so challenging. They kept flying around, not settling anywhere, and I had almost given up hope when they landed on that flower. However, I kept my eyes on it as its stem and the tip of the flowers were purple; I knew they’d loan a pleasing color to the scene and match the background nicely.

Close up of a pink African Daisy (Osteospermum)
African Daisy (Osteospermum)

An African daisy shot with my new macro lens. As much as I cherished my old one, I love this lens!

Close up of a mute swan cygnet (Cygnus olor) cleaning its feathers
Mute swan cygnet (Cygnus olor)

2022 hasn’t been a good swan year, at least not for me. Almost every time I set out to photograph swans, I couldn’t find any. I photographed this mute swan cygnet almost by accident. I was out in the woods, looking for squirrels, and passing by the beach when I saw the swan family swimming lazily around and cleaning their feathers.

Cherry tree flowers at Kungsträdgården, Stockholm
Cherry tree flowers at Kungsträdgården, Stockholm

I just love photographing cherry tree blossoms in the spring. It doesn’t feel like spring if I don’t! Not a masterpiece by any means, but I love the light and the spring feeling it evokes every time I look at it.

Obviously, I love pink.

Red squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris) standing in the snow
Red squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris)

I also love squirrels. So much that it’s a wonder that this post only contains ONE squirrel photo.

Partying hard, another red squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris)

Wait, what! Only one squirrel photo? No, no, no! This has to be remediated immediately! Here you go! Cheers and Happy New Year!

Great spotted woodpecker (Dendrocopos major) wearing a golden party hat and holding a champagne glass.
Great spotted woodpecker (Dendrocopos major)

OK, this won’t win any wildlife photography contest, but I love it! I had so much fun processing this! I spent a ridiculous amount of time trying to fit the champagne glass between the claws perfectly.

This said, I wish you a very, very Happy New Year! Gott Nytt År as we say in Swedish.



Christmas Sale: All Prints Are 50% Off

Christmas sale poster

Looking for a Christmas gift or just a present for you or someone you love? Photo prints make lovely gifts; right now, all my prints are 50% off in my online shop from December 15th to 30th.

Click here to go to my online store. Shop early and save 50%!



What Photography Is All About

Red squirrel in the snow

Sometimes things happen the way you hope they’d happen 😉 Teddy shows up after only a few minutes of wait; he strikes a lovely pose where I want him to, and it even starts to snow! It doesn’t happen very often, but it is a pleasant change when it does.

Photography is preparation AND a little bit of luck, isn’t it?


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Black Friday Sale: All Prints Are 50% Off

Black Friday starts now!

Get your Christmas gift shopping done early with my Black Friday sale! All my prints are 50% off until November 27th.

Click here to go to my online store. Shop early and save 50%!



Swan Lake

Close up of a mute swan cygnet (Cygnus olor) cleaning its feathers. 
A mute swan cygnet (Cygnus olor) cleaning its feathers. You can purchase this image in my online shop.

You’d think that photographing swans (or any other waterfowl) would be easy when you live on an island with plenty of birds around. And it is, most of the time. Not when you set out to photograph them, though. 

Close up of a mute swan cygnet (Cygnus olor) cleaning its feathers. 

During my usual walks along the coast, I could see many swans paddling quietly around the island, foraging, or cleaning their feathers, always close to the shore. So I’d think, “I’ll come back and take some photos.” Then I’d come back with my camera, and one of these two things would happen:

1) They wouldn’t be there. At all. Gone. Hasta la vista, baby!

2) They would be far away at sea, out of the reach of my telelens.

 

Mute swan cygnet (Cygnus olor)
Mute swan cygnet (Cygnus olor)

But time, patience, and perseverance paid off, so I could take the photos—eventually 😉. These are some of the photos I was able to take after several frustrating attempts.

Have you tried taking photos of birds or animals? 


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New Macro Lens: Canon RF100mm

Macro photo of a pink African daisy (Osteospermum)
African Daisy (Osteospermum)

I finally gave in and replaced my old macro lens (the beloved Canon EF 100mm ƒ2.8 Macro). I was reluctant to let it go because it is a good lens, albeit a bit heavy. It lacks image stabilization, though, and it’s not a problem if you use a tripod. I, on the other hand, seldom use a tripod. I like to move around freely. 

Macro photo of petals of a pink dahlia
Dahlia

Enter Canon RF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM. What a difference! It has a new design, is not as bulky and heavy as the old one, and fits much better in your hand. And most important, it has image stabilization. Even if handheld, the combined camera and lens image stabilization let me get sharp images at f/5 – something I couldn’t have dreamt of with the old lens. After checking the first photos I’d taken with the new lens, It was easy to let go of the old.

Macro photo of petals of pink African daisy (Osteospermum
African daisy (Osteospermum)

So, here you go, a few photos taken in my garden with a Canon R5 camera fitted with the new lens. Which one do you like best?

Pssst! The top image is available to purchase as print or digital download in my shop, along with other flower photos.


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Damselflies and Dragonflies

Macro photo of mating emerald damselflies (Lestes sponsa)
Emerald Damselfly (Lestes sponsa)

This is one of my favorite photos, mating emerald damselflies (Lestes sponsa). The top one is the male; females lack the bright blue color of the males.

Damselflies are most common in July and August, so I spent the last couple of weeks by the small lake near our house photographing them. Emerald damselflies are found mainly near stagnant water (lakes and ponds, canals, etc.), rarely along flowing water. Aren’t they beautiful?

Macro photo of a common winter damselfly (Sympecma fusca)

A well-camouflaged winter damselfly (Sympecma fusca). They like to perch among reeds, where their muted colors allow them to blend in.

They’re related to the emerald damselflies (Lestes sponsa) and, like them, can be found near stagnant water; but they don’t have their bright red or blue colors.

MAcro photo of a Western Willow Spreadwing (Chalcolestes viridis)

Western Willow Spreadwing (Chalcolestes viridis)

Macro photo of a moustached darter (Sympetrum vulgatum)

Moustached Darter (Sympetrum vulgatum)

Macro photo of a moustached darter (Sympetrum vulgatum)

Another photo of that moustached darter.

Which photo do you like most? My favorite is the top one, the mating emerald damselflies, even though it was hard to choose, I love them all!


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Time to Shoot Macro!

Macro photo of a pink bleeding heart (Lamprocapnos spectabilis)
Bleeding heart (Lamprocapnos spectabilis)

I’d grown so fond of my tele lens (Canon RF100-500mm F4.5-7.1 L IS USM), which works so well for both wildlife and flowers, that I’d completely forgotten my macro lens (Canon EF 100mm ƒ2.8 Macro) that I used so much until a couple of years ago.

Macro photo of a black-veined white butterfly (Aporia crataegi)
Black-veined white butterfly (Aporia crataegi)

I truly loved that macro lens, an old design that still works; poor thing, forgotten in my photo cabinet, at the back with old lens caps, batteries, and what not. Time to take it out and show it some love, I decided. So, here you go, a few photos taken in my garden with Canon R5 fitted with that macro lens.

Macro photo of a ladybug
Ladybug

Which photo do you like best?


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Gorgeous Glory of the Snow

Low angle close-up of blooming glory of the snow

Lovely glory of the snow in the morning light. These photos were pure luck. I did plan to scout the woods for a field of Scilla to photograph, but I didn’t need to in the end. As I was returning from an early seabird photo session, this incredible sea of blue flowers caught my eye while waiting for the traffic light to turn green. It turned out there was such a field next to one of the parking lots of our little shopping center! Since we order most of our stuff online, I rarely go by that lot. So there you have it, as a photographer, you need both preparation and luck 😉.

Low angle close-up of blooming glory of the snow
Lovely glory of the snow in the morning light.

Both images are available to purchase as prints or digital downloads in my shop, along with other flower photos.


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Spring in Stockholm!

Close-up of  a flowering cherry tree branch

Spring has finally arrived in Stockholm, at last! I have hundreds of photos of the Japanese cherry trees blooming in Kungsträdgården in Stockholm already, yet I go there every spring to take a few more. I can’t help it!

Close-up of  a flowering cherry tree branches

Both images are available to purchase as prints or digital downloads in my shop, along with earlier cherry tree flower photos.


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